Medical Marijuana

The more we learn, the more we confirm that medicinal herbs used in ancient healing traditions are, indeed, healing.

Medical Marijuana

Plant Based Medicine

Plants provided our first medicines. Evidence from pre-historic sites suggest and written records confirm that plants have been used medicinally for thousands of years.

Historical Discoveries

Through discoveries made after the science of chemistry began in the 1800s, certain medicinal alkaloids were isolated from their source plants, including morphine, quinine and caffeine. Although many modern medicines are based on plant constituents, a rift between chemical pharmacology and the practice of traditional herbal medicines developed. The separation grew stronger over time, until recent interest in integrative medicine began to bridge the divide.

Contributing Factors

One of the factors that contributes to the new interest in medicinal herbs is the growing awareness that isolated constituents extracted from herbal plants are often less effective than they are when consumed simultaneously with all the other constituents present in the whole plant.

Living Plant

A living plant is a complex system with thousands of interacting chemicals, and many of them work together in synergy – creating a greater impact than the effect of consuming isolated components in single molecule pharmaceuticals.

Constituents

The constituents of a whole plant, or whole plant extract, influence each other in a number of ways that effects their impact on the consumer. There are several different ways they may work in synergy. They may help stabilize each other, potentiate or enhance each other, or modify the impact of certain elements. They may help make a constituent more water soluble or protect it from stomach acids. All of these are ways that the synergies created in taking in a whole plant can produce radically different results than taking the chemically isolated ingredients.

Plant Extracts

Whole herbs or whole plant extracts are best for retaining the overall medicinal effectiveness. They provide not only the presence of each active constituent but also the relative concentration of the constituents, preserving the profile of the herb and supporting its intended action.

St. John’s Wort, for example, known for its soothing effects, acts on enzymes in the brain that influence serotonin levels. Chemists isolated the “active ingredient,” only to discover that another ingredient was also “active,” and then another. In fact, the plant has a complex chemistry, including constituents that render the active ingredients more water soluble – more accessible and therefore more easily absorbed and effective.

Disease States

Intractable Pain

Malignant Disease – Pain

  • Study – Pharmacotherapeutic considerations for use of cannabinoids to relieve pain in patients with malignant diseases
    – M Darkovska-Serafimovska 2018 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Chronic Pain

  • Systematic reviews on therapeutic efficacy and safety of Cannabis (including extracts and tinctures) for patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, dementia and Tourette syndrome, HIV/AIDS, and cancer receiving chemotherapy
    – L Amato 2017 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Neuropathic Pain – MS

  • A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of THC/CBD oromucosal spray in combination with the existing treatment regimen, in the relief of central neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis
    – RM Langford 2013 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Oromucosal delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol/cannabidiol for neuropathic pain associated with multiple sclerosis: an uncontrolled, open-label, 2-year extension trial
    – D Rog 2007 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis
    – D Rog 2005 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Non-cardiac Chest Pain

  • Dronabinol increases pain threshold in patients with functional chest pain: a pilot double-blind placebo-controlled trial
    – Z Malik 2016 (THC – Dronabinol) View Article

Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

  • Effect of Cannabinoids on Spasticity and Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injured Persons
    – K Ethans 2015 (THC – Dronabinol) View Article

Pancreatitis – Abdominal Pain

  • Δ9-THC (Namisol®) in Chronic Pancreatitis Patients Suffering From Persistent Abdominal Pain
    – H Van Goor 2014 (THC – Namisol) View Article

Neuropathic Pain – MS

  • Efficacy and Safety of the Pain Relieving Effect of Dronabinol in Central Neuropathic Pain Related to Multiple Sclerosis
    – S Schimrgk 2010 (THC – Dronabinol) View Article

Neurological Pain

  • A Study to Evaluate the Effects of Cannabis Based Medicine in Patients With Pain of Neurological Origin
    – W Notcutt 2002 (THC – Marinol) View Article
Cancer Pain

Cancer – Pain

  • Results of a Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study of Nabiximols Oromucosal Spray as an Adjunctive Therapy in Advanced Cancer Patients with Chronic Uncontrolled Pain
    – A Lichtman 2018 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Medical Marijuana Use in Oncology A Review
    – G Wilkie 2016 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group Study of the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of THC:CBD Extract & THC Extract in Patients w/Intractable Cancer-Related Pain
    – J Johnson 2010 (1:1 Oro-mucosal spray) View Article

Adv Cancer – Pain

  • An open-label extension study to investigate the long-term safety and tolerability of THC/CBD oromucosal spray and oromucosal THC spray in patients with terminal cancer-related pain refractory to strong opioid analgesics
    – J Johnson 2013 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Opiod-Refractory Cancer Pain

  • Nabiximols for opioid-treated cancer patients with poorly-controlled chronic pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled, graded-dose trial
    – RK Portenoy 2012 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
Cancer - Chemotherapy-induced nausea & vomiting

Cancer – Childhood Chemo Nausea Vomiting

  • Antiemetic medication for prevention and treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in childhood
    – R Phillips 2016 (THC – Cannabis) View Article 

Chemotherapy Induced Nausea

  • Dronabinol for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting unresponsive to antiemetics.
    – M May 2016 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article

Cancer – Nausea and Vomiting

  • Cannabinoids for nausea and vomiting in adults with cancer receiving chemotherapy
    – LA Smith 2015 (THC-Cannabis Exacts) View Article
  • Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system
    – KA Sharkey 2014 (THC-Dronabinol, 1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination with ondansetron versus ondansetron alone for delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
    – E Meiri 2007 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article
AIDS/Positive HIV status-Adjunctive-treatment for side effects

HIV/AIDS – Morbidity and Mortality

  • The medical use of cannabis for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV/AIDS.
    – EE Lutge 2013 (THC-Cannabis) View Article
Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome

Lung Cancer – Anorexia

  • The effect of nabilone on appetite, nutritional status, and quality of life in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial
    – JG Turcott 2018 (THC-Nabilone) View Article

Anorexia and Weight Loss

  • Dronabinol oral solution in the management of anorexia and weight loss in AIDS and cancer
    – M Badowski 2018 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article 

HIV-Wasting Syndrome

  • A Phase I/II Study to Evaluate Single Agent and Combination Therapy With Megestrol Acetate and Dronabinol for the Treatment of HIV-Wasting Syndrome
    – G Galetto 2008 (THC-Dronabinol Megestrol) View Article

Cancer – Anorexia

  • Dronabinol versus megestrol acetate versus combination therapy for cancer-associated anorexia: a North Central Cancer Treatment Group study
    – A Jatoi 2002 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article
Seizure Disorders

Refer to Epilepsy Category

Epilepsy

Epilepsy – Children

  • Efficacy of CBD-enriched medical cannabis for treatment of refractory epilepsy in children and adolescents – An observational, longitudinal study
    – M Hausman-Kedem 2018 (20:1) View Article

Epilepsy

  • Epilepsy and Cannabis: A Literature Review
    – S Zaheer 2018 (CBD:THC and CBD) View Article
  • Cannabinoids and Epilepsy
    – EC Rosenberg 2015 (CBD) View Article
  • Epilepsy Cannabinoids for epilepsy
    – D Gloss 2014 (CBD) View Article

Epilepsy – Pediatric

  • CBD-enriched medical cannabis for intractable pediatric epilepsy: The current Israeli experience
    – M Tzadok 2016 (20:1) View Article

 

Multiple Sclerosis

MS

  • Evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of THC-CBD oromucosal spray in symptom management of patients with spasticity due to
    multiple sclerosis
    – U Zetti 2016 (1:1 Oro-mucosal spray) View Article
  • Tetrahydrocannabinol:Cannabidiol Oromucosal Spray for Multiple Sclerosis-Related Resistant Spasticity in Daily Practice
    – P Vermersch 2016 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Sativex(®) and clinical-neurophysiological measures of spasticity in progressive multiple sclerosis.
    – L Leocani 2015 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: recent clinical trials.
    – O Fernandez 2014 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of Sativex, in subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
    – C Collin 2010 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Randomized controlled trial of cannabis based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
    – C Collin 2007 (1:1 Oro- mucosal spray) View Article
  • Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects on symptoms in multiple sclerosis? A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study on 160 patients
    – D Wade 2004 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

MS-Neurologic Disorders

  • Systematic review: Efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders
    – B Koppel 2014 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
Spasticity

Spasticity

  • Clinical and Preclinical Evidence for Functional Interactions of Cannabidiol and Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol
    – D Boggs 2018 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

  • Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol in the treatment of spasticity in chronic spinal cord injury: a clinical experience
    – C Grao-Castellote 2017 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Spasticity – MS Induced

  • Evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of THC-CBD oromucosal spray in symptom management of patients with spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
    – U Zetti 2016 (1:1 Oro-mucosal spray) View Article
  • Tetrahydrocannabinol:Cannabidiol Oromucosal Spray for Multiple Sclerosis-Related Resistant Spasticity in Daily Practice
    – P Vermersch 2016 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Sativex® and clinical-neurophysiological measures of spasticity in progressive multiple sclerosis.
    – L Leocani 2015 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: recent clinical trials.
    – O Fernandez 2014 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of Sativex, in subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
    – C Collin 2010 (1:1 Sativex) View Article
  • Randomized controlled trial of cannabis based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
    – C Collin 2007 (1:1 Oro-mucosal CBM) View Article
  • Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects on symptoms in multiple sclerosis? A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study on 160 patients
    – D Wade 2004 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

  • Effect of Cannabinoids on Spasticity and Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord Injured Persons
    – K Ethans 2015 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article

Spasms – ALS

  • Randomized Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial With THC (Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol) for the Treatment of Cramps in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
    – M Weber 2009 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article
Severe Muscle Spasms

Refer to Spasticity Category

Parkinson’s Disease

MS, Autism, Parkinsons, Alzheimers, Tourette’s, Huntington’s, Epilepsy

  • Neurological Disorders in Medical Use of Cannabis: An Update
    – R Solimini 2017 (THC, CBD, plant) View Article

Parkinsons

  • The Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids for Movement Disorders
    – B Kluger 2015 (THC-Nabilone) View Article
  • Cannabis for dyskinesia in Parkinson disease A randomized double-blind crossover study
    – CB Carroll 2004 (Extract-Oral Cannabis) View Article
  • Cannabinoids reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study
    – KA Sierdzan 2001 (THC-Nabilone) View Article

PD-Neurologic Disorders

  • Systematic review: Efficacy and safety of medical marijuana in selected neurologic disorders
    – B Koppel 2014 (THC, plant) View Article
Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Retinal Hemodynamics

  • Dronabinol and retinal hemodynamics in humans
    – N Plange 2007 (THC-Dronabinol) View Article

Interocular Pressure

  • Effect of sublingual application of cannabinoids on intraocular pressure: a pilot study. [CBD shown to cause adverse events.]
    – I Tomida 2006 (Sublingual THC & CBD) View Article
PTSD

PTSD

  • Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention
    – M Zer-Aviv 2016 (THC-Nabilone) View Article
  • Preliminary, open-label, pilot study of add-on oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder
    – P Roitman 2014 (Oral THC) View Article

PTSD – Nightmares

  • The efficacy of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid, in the treatment of PTSD-associated nightmares: A preliminary randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design study
    – R Jetly 2015 (THC-Nabilone) View Article

PTSD – Nightmares, Insomnia, Chronic Pain

  • Use of a Synthetic Cannabinoid in a Correctional Population for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder–Related Insomnia and Nightmares, Chronic Pain, Harm Reduction, and Other Indications
    – C Cameron 2014 (THC-Nabilone) View Article
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism

  • Cannabidiol Based Medical Cannabis in Children with Autism- a Retrospective Feasibility Study
    – A Aran 2018 (20:1) View Article
  • Oral Cannabidiol Use in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder to Treat Related Symptoms and Co-morbidities
    – D Barchel 2018 (20:1) View Article
Crohn’s Disease

Crohns

  • Cannabis finds its way into treatment of Crohn’s disease
    – R Schicho 2014 (THC, plant) View Article
  • Side effects, health risks, and a short duration of action limit the usefulness of this drug
    – T Naftali 2013 (THC) View Article
Muscular Dystrophy - Pain

Malignant Disease – Pain

  • Pharmacotherapeutic considerations for use of cannabinoids to relieve pain in patients with malignant diseases
    – M Darkovska-Serafimovska 2018 (1:1 Sativex) View Article

What forms of Medical Marijuana are allowed in Louisiana?

The acceptable forms of medical marijuana in Louisiana, approved by the legislature, are oils, extracts, tinctures, sprays, capsules, pills, solutions, suspension, gelatin-based chewables, lotions, transdermal patches, suppositories, and metered-dosed inhalation.

*The only currently available form of medical marijuana is tinctures. As the medical marijuana program grows in Louisiana, we expect more dosage forms to become approved and/or available.

What are Medical Cannabis Tinctures?
Medical cannabis tinctures are packaged in a 30 mL glass bottle with a dropper. Tincture dosages are easy to self-titrate and measure. Tinctures are easily absorbed by the liver, so the effects are felt more quickly than in pill or gelatin based chewable form. Because of this, tinctures represent an effective method of consumption for precise dosing.

Tinctures are administered either: (click here)

Orally

  • You place the instructed dosage into your mouth and swallow. You should start to feel the effects coming on between 30 to 90 minutes, with a peak maximum effect reached after two to three hours, and last for about 4 to 12 hours, depending on the dose.

Sublingually

  • You place the instructed dosage under your tongue and hold for 30 seconds and then swallow. This helps get the medicine into your bloodstream quicker and is a preferred method that will allow you to feel the effects coming on faster and stronger.
Oils

Oil is a concentrated extract derived from the marijuana plant. Oils can be consumed in many ways, but the most common are placing under your tongue via a dropper or through a vaping device. Depending on how the oil was consumed, it typically will take up to 20 minutes to start feeling the effects.

Extracts

Extracts are a type of concentrate created using solvents (alcohol, carbon dioxide, etc.) that essentially wash the trichomes off the cannabis plant, collecting them for further refinement. All having similar effects, cannabis extracts can come in many different forms, like oils, lotions, sprays, and more.

Sprays

Cannabis sprays are another form of tincture. Sprays come in small bottles, that allows you to consume the oil. Usually used by spraying inside mouth onto cheeks and under the tongue, the effects can take approximately 30 minutes. 

Capsules

Capsuled cannabis comes in a small pill-like form, allowing the patient to ingest orally. Researchers say that a capsule pain-relieving effect may last longer throughout the day.

Solutions

Medical marijuana solutions are mixtures that dissolve thoroughly, allowing each ingredient to be equally distributed. Some cannabis solutions can include lotions.

Suspensions

In a medical marijuana suspension, there are usually two main ingredients that are unable to dissolve with one another. Therefore, there are small particles that remain intact. Most cannabis suspensions include oils. 

Gelatin-Based Chewables

Gelatin-based chewables are another option for patients who choose not or does not want to consume capsule forms of medical marijuana. When consuming chewables, the cannabis enters the bloodstream and is further digested. This then is broken down by the stomach and absorbed by the intestines. These chewables take typically 30 minutes- 1 hour to reach the maximum effect.

Lotions

Medical marijuana comes in topical forms, such as creams and lotions.  This allows the patient to rub on the lotion at any point where they may be experiencing discomfort or pain. Lotions are known to help over-worked muscles, patients with eczema and psoriasis, or any kind of aches and pains.  

Since the rate of absorption of the skin is slow, this allows the therapeutic relief to last longer, while avoiding the altered mental states from developing.  

Transdermal Patches

Transdermal patches are an easy and effective way to receive pain relief throughout the day. These medical marijuana patches allow an immediate infusion into the bloodstream allowing all day relief. Transdermal cannabis patches range in dosages and are very user friendly: it’s as simple as unwrapping and sticking it to the desired area.

Suppositories

Over the past few years the use of these medical marijuana suppositories has risen. After entering the rectal mucosa, the healing components of the plant-based medicine quickly spread to the organs and into the bloodstream. Unlike pills or any oral consumption of medical cannabis, suppositories do not allow the patient to experience a “head high”.  These are also easy to use at home and offers just as many benefits as any other product. 

Metered Dose Inhalation

Charged with natural extracts of cannabis, the aerosol sprayed from a metered dose inhaler is coarser than smoke yielding more cannabinoids per dose. Very little of the product (~5%) dissipates or is exhaled, allowing you to medicate without exposing others to significant second hand aerosol.

Pharmacy & Physician Locator

Click each region to view information.

Locator
Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 6 Region 7 Region 8 Region 9

Region 1

Pharmacies:
H & W Drug Store
1667 Tchoupitoulas Street
New Orleans, LA 70130
hwdispensary.com

Physicians:
MMDL
Dr. Peter Candelora, MD
3900 N. Causeway Boulevard
Ste. 1200
Metairie, LA 70002
[email protected]
727-847-9193

Spectrum Neurology Center
Dr. Alexis Carimi
Spectrum Neurology Center
3409 Division Street
Metairie, LA 70002
spectrumpain.com
504-454-7246

ACCURATE CLINIC
Dr. Eric Ehlenberger, MD
2401 Veterans Boulevard
Kenner, LA 70062
accurateclinic.com
504-472-6130

Louisiana Pain Specialists
Dr. Joshua Kaufman, MD
3434 Houma Boulevard
Ste. 301
Metairie, LA 70006
504-754-2334

3439 Prytania Street
Ste. 501
New Orleans, LA 70115
504-754-2334

McKenna General Medical LLC
Dr. Dwight McKenna, MD
1827 Gentilly Boulevard
New Orleans, LA 70119
504-943-1923

Podesta Wellness
Dr. Arwen Podesta
Podesta Wellness
4322 Canal St.
New Orleans, LA 70119
PodestaWellness.com
504-252-0026

Oak Street Medical
Dr. Radha Raman, MD
8708 Oak Street
New Orleans, LA 70118
Oakstmedical.com
504-865-0805

Dr. Stephanie Seasly, MD
3440 Division Street
Metairie, LA 70002
504-837-7817

Zen Acupuncture
Lihua Zhang, MD
3004 19th Street
Metairie, LA 70002
504-513-2531

Green Leaf Medical Center
51 Holmes Blvd Suite A
Terrytown, LA 70056
greenleafmedcenter.com
504-940-4942

Region 2

Pharmacies:
Capitol Wellness Solutions
7491 Picardy Ave.
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
https://capitolpharmacy.com

Physicians:
Dr. Leone Elliot
Medical Marijuana Baton Rouge
3488 Brentwood Drive, Suites 102 & 103
Baton Rouge, LA 70809
medicalmarijuanabatonrouge.com
225-384-5378

Dr. Victor Chou
Medical Marijuana Clinic of Louisiana
12525 Perkins Rd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70810
MarijuanaClinicLa.com
225-800-3162

The Healing Clinics
11715 Bricksome Ave. Suite A-6
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
thehealingclinics.com
318-227-4088

Region 3

Pharmacies:
Green Leaf Dispensary
6048 W Park Ave.
Houma, LA 70364

Physicians:
The Healing Clinics
209 Bayou Gardens Blvd, Suite S
Houma, LA 70364
thehealingclinics.com
318-227-4088

Dr. Jonathan Allen
Green Medical Solutions
801 Barrow St #420
Houma, LA 70360
thegreenmedmd.com
985-242-4577

Dr. K. Gerald Haydel
Raceland - 502 Barrow St
Houma, LA 70360
985-537-0048

Region 4

Pharmacies:
The Apothecary Shoppe

620 Guilbeau Rd Suite A
Lafayette, LA 70506
https://theapothecaryshoppe.net/

Physicians:
Green RX - Dr. Cher Aymond

4605 N University Ave.
Carencro, LA 70520
chermd.net
337-357-8882

Dr. Geoffery Mire
202 Westgate Rd.
Lafayette, LA 70506
mdvip.com/doctors/GeoffreyMireMD
337-298-2991

The Healing Clinics
850 Kaliste Saloom Road, Suite 103
Lafayette, LA 70508
thehealingclinics.com
318-227-4088

Region 5

Pharmacies:
Medicis Pharmacy
1727 Imperial Blvd Building 4
Lake Charles, LA 70605
https://medicispharmacy.com

Physicians:
Modern Medicine (Dan Butler, MD)
1924 Southwood Dr.
Lake Charles, LA 70605
https://modernmedicinela.com

Anand Roy, MD
1000 Walters St.
Lake Charles, LA 70607

Region 6

Pharmacies:
The Medicine Cabinet Pharmacy
403 Bolton Ave.
Alexandria, LA 71301

Region 7

Pharmacies:
Hope Pharmacy
1410 Kings Hwy Suite A
Shreveport, LA 71103

Physicians:
The Healing Clinics
745 Olive Street, Suite 202
Shreveport, LA 71104
thehealingclinics.com
318-227-4088

Region 8

Pharmacies:
Delta Medmar
111 McMillan Rd.
West Monroe, LA 71291

Physicians:
The Healing Clinics
100 South Second Street
Monroe, LA 71201
thehealingclinics.com
318-227-4088

Region 9

Pharmacies:
Willow Pharmacy
1519 LA-22 #5
Madisonville, LA 70447

Physicians:
Cypress Pointe Pain Management
Dr. Chad Domangue
Dr. Jonathan Thompson
19184 Dr John Lambert Dr #103
Hammond, LA 70403
Cppain.com
985-892-8934

Cypress Pointe Pain Management
Dr. Chad Domangue
Dr. Jonathan Thompson
76 Starbrush Cir.
Covington, LA 70433
Cppain.com
985-892-8934

Cypress Pointe Pain Management
Dr. Chad Domangue
Dr. Jonathan Thompson
1570 Lindberg Dr #4
Slidell, LA 70458
Cppain.com
985-892-8934

Paradise on Columbia
Dr. Michael Haas
200 N Columbia St.
Covington, LA 70433
Paradiseoncolumbia.com
985-892-8827

Dr. Candice Knight
2033 N Hwy 190 #16
Covington, LA 70433
Knightintegrative.com
985-867-5516

Urgent Care of Slidell
Dr. Stephanie Seasly
360 Gateway Dr Suite B
Slidell, LA 70461
985-661-8851

Contact

530 Spanish Town Road | Baton Rouge, LA